My goal is share information that will help myself and others invest in our future before it's too late. This includes investing basics, savings strategies, and other information that will enlighten you about money.

This blog is a creation of Daisy Kwan.


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Aug 8, 2013
@ 4:44 pm
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Chinese Man Spent $967,000 On Lottery Tickets »

moneyisnotimportant:

GROUNDBREAKING PERSONAL FINANCE ADVICE OF THE DAY: Don’t do this.

Spoiler alert: He didn’t win.


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Aug 7, 2013
@ 8:28 pm
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In every immediate goal there is a wealth of deeper values and hopes that are our long-term goals, if we take the time to look closely. They point directly to what we truly need in the future.

How to set goals that will keep you fulfilled and focused (via fastcompany)


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Aug 7, 2013
@ 5:06 pm
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Always re-examine and reflect on where you are in your career at least every two years. Even if you’re perfectly happy with your job, the exercise forces you to check that you are actually enjoying your work and learning on the job rather than just being comfortable.

Edmond Lau, who was an early engineer at Quora, offers advice that he received by way of a friend’s mento.

4 must-have skills to bolster any career

(via fastcompany)


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Aug 6, 2013
@ 9:34 am
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theatlantic:

The Confessions of Innocent Men

Any good criminal-defense attorney will tell you to say four words if you are about to be arrested for murder: I want a lawyer.
This is simple advice and should be easy to remember during an interrogation, but not everyone recalls it under the pressure of police questioning. Some people make matters worse for themselves in the face of strong evidence by providing an alibi or identifying another person as the perpetrator. Many succumb to the wiles of homicide detectives and implicate themselves to some lesser degree in the crime, heeding the admonition that a partial loss is better than going down for the whole thing. Some accused people are tricked into confessing, and some confess to crimes they did not commit. A certain percentage, worn down by conscience or questioning or the simple desire to get the interrogation over with, provide a detailed and honest explanation for what they did.
And then there’s Anthony Sylvanus. He came to the attention of Philadelphia homicide detectives in March 2001 while minding his own business at the State Correctional Institution at Albion — a stone’s throw from Lake Erie, and as far away from his crime as the geography of Pennsylvania allows — where he was serving a sentence of 10 to 20 years. While someone doing that much time can’t be said to have much luck, whatever small amount he did possess was about to run out. Two events would cause this turn: the advent of the Automated Fingerprint Identification System, and a random conversation between a police captain in Philadelphia and a murder victim’s granddaughter.
Read more. [Andrey_Kuzmin/Shutterstock]

theatlantic:

The Confessions of Innocent Men

Any good criminal-defense attorney will tell you to say four words if you are about to be arrested for murder: I want a lawyer.

This is simple advice and should be easy to remember during an interrogation, but not everyone recalls it under the pressure of police questioning. Some people make matters worse for themselves in the face of strong evidence by providing an alibi or identifying another person as the perpetrator. Many succumb to the wiles of homicide detectives and implicate themselves to some lesser degree in the crime, heeding the admonition that a partial loss is better than going down for the whole thing. Some accused people are tricked into confessing, and some confess to crimes they did not commit. A certain percentage, worn down by conscience or questioning or the simple desire to get the interrogation over with, provide a detailed and honest explanation for what they did.

And then there’s Anthony Sylvanus. He came to the attention of Philadelphia homicide detectives in March 2001 while minding his own business at the State Correctional Institution at Albion — a stone’s throw from Lake Erie, and as far away from his crime as the geography of Pennsylvania allows — where he was serving a sentence of 10 to 20 years. While someone doing that much time can’t be said to have much luck, whatever small amount he did possess was about to run out. Two events would cause this turn: the advent of the Automated Fingerprint Identification System, and a random conversation between a police captain in Philadelphia and a murder victim’s granddaughter.

Read more. [Andrey_Kuzmin/Shutterstock]


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Aug 6, 2013
@ 9:33 am
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51 notes

usatoday:

Just half of U.S. adults say a college degree is a good investment.

usatoday:

Just half of U.S. adults say a college degree is a good investment.


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Jul 31, 2013
@ 9:41 pm
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615 notes

It takes 66 days until an action becomes something you do without thinking.

— So start with easy, micro-goals and be patient. Here, a few tips on building super productive habits. (via fastcompany)


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Jul 31, 2013
@ 9:40 pm
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Comparing yourself to those who had ridiculously good opportunities

Let’s face it. There will always be someone better than you and you’ll just strain yourself trying to “1 up” that person. This applies to a lot of different situations - your career, your athletic abilities, and especially money.

For example, take Friend 1. She drives a Mercedes E Class, fully loaded. Has a closet of Louis Vuitton bags. Owns a diamond encrusted rolex. Pays a mortgage on a $1 million home. She’s 26 and she teaches middle school.

Whoa there, did the government finally decide to pay educators their true value? Guess again. She was blessed with a dad who earned mega wealth in his late 40s, going from broke poor to buying mansions and showering his daughter. Chances are, you won’t get the same opportunities she has.

Friend 2. He’s 30 and a millionaire. He makes $70K in interest in 6 months off investments. There’s a chance he makes more than you do in a whole year.

How’d he do it? Start his own business? Nope. Stock options that make him a multi millionaire! 

Oftentimes, I find that people focus too much on the glamorous lives people live due to their access to cash. They’re enamored by the amount of cash flow their friends see. 

But what we should really be focusing on is how that money came to be. The money was hard earned through blood, sweat and tears from someone. What qualities made that person successful?

If you want to be wealthy yourself, you need to change the way you think. You need to focus on what skills and what type of road you need to take to wealth.

It could mean investing your own money to learn new skills for work.

It could mean networking at events and just learning to sell yourself and find new opportunities.

It could mean a lot of things, but you need to INVEST now to reap the benefits your wealthy friends or friends or friends have. 


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Jul 24, 2013
@ 10:06 pm
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The Challenge: Cutting Down On Purchases

There are times when I find myself wandering around Target and realizing that my cart is full of random items. I could easily toss a few bottles of nail polish in there, dog toys, random household goods and much more in my cart without a second thought. 

But it’s really when I walk to the register when I wonder why I picked up more nail polish when I have a sizable collection in my bathroom. I wonder why I need to buy my dog more toys when my living room is littered with them. 

Many of us have been there. We’re just buying to buy. But really, this is a money pit. We need to be wary of where we’re putting our dollars, because a few purchases here and there will add up at the end of the month.

The Challenge

I’m going to challenge myself to not buy frivolous items like nail polishes, lip glosses and related items until I’m down to my very last one. Even dog toys since he’s so spoiled!

It will be an interesting exercise to see how many items I place back on the shelf. While I won’t be keeping a hard tally on how much I theoretically saved, I believe it will have a positive effect on my wallet and shopping behaviors in the future.


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Aug 30, 2011
@ 12:06 pm
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238 notes

moneyisnotimportant:

vonzumwalt:

kinda crazy. apple has more cash than the U.S. government.

This really puts things into perspective!

moneyisnotimportant:

vonzumwalt:

kinda crazy. apple has more cash than the U.S. government.

This really puts things into perspective!


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Aug 29, 2011
@ 12:06 pm
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16 notes


I’ve been hearing about it for months, but late last week, the fact that most American’s can’t afford a $1,000 emergency expense started making its way across the web.

According to CNN Money, “most” accounts for a whopping 64% of Americans. Wow. Just wow. The remaining 36% could dip into their emergency funds to cover the cost, but the rest could not. CNN Money notes that the majority of Americans would have to “go to other extremes to cover an unexpected expense, such as borrowing money or taking out a cash advance on a credit card.” (via What’s This Emergency Fund You’re Talking About? | Invest for Later)

I’ve been hearing about it for months, but late last week, the fact that most American’s can’t afford a $1,000 emergency expense started making its way across the web.

According to CNN Money, “most” accounts for a whopping 64% of Americans. Wow. Just wow. The remaining 36% could dip into their emergency funds to cover the cost, but the rest could not. CNN Money notes that the majority of Americans would have to “go to other extremes to cover an unexpected expense, such as borrowing money or taking out a cash advance on a credit card.” (via What’s This Emergency Fund You’re Talking About? | Invest for Later)